Wading into the Debate

It’s controversial, and some of you are going to be mad, but at the risk of offending sensibilities I feel compelled to take a stand on that age-old debate: dogs or cats? Now, I love them both—don’t get me wrong—but when it comes to storytelling, dogs make worthier subjects. Forgive me cat lovers. This isn’t to say that cats aren’t fascinating in real life. Cats are softer, and I might even argue that kittens are cuter than puppies. But on the page, dogs rule. Readers, Continue reading →

Book Clubs: Love ’em or Hate ’em?

Sometimes I finish a book aching to talk about it. You know what I mean: The story has burrowed under your skin, the ideas keep ticking in your head, and you just can’t let it go. At times like these, rather than latch onto strangers on the street or corner them in elevators, it’s nice to belong to a book club. One friend of mine had a book club that left me envious. Not only did their reading list include literary masterpieces, but they had Continue reading →

Judging a Book by its Cover

A or B. Which of these two covers below best addresses the question, “What does an old stuffed bunny have to do with a missing three-year-old and a religious cult?” If your answer is “A” you agree with everyone I asked last Sunday while signing at the L.A. Times Festival of Books at USC. “A” is the fantastic new Suspense Publishing cover for Last Writes, which was the fourth book in my forensic handwriting series (2010). The first four books were published by Penguin, who Continue reading →

It’s Convention Time Again

By Sheila Lowe When my first two books were published it never occurred to me to attend a convention. They were both nonfiction books about handwriting (The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Handwriting Analysis in 2000 and Handwriting of the Famous & Infamous in 2001). I did a lot of traveling around, promoting at book signings and giving lectures about handwriting analysis, but that was the extent of my PR efforts. By the time my first mystery was published I approached promotion differently. Luckily, one of the very smart Continue reading →